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Iceland Spas: The Ultimate Guide To Shake Your Stress Away

Visiting a geothermal spa in Iceland is one of the best things to do on your trip. It is undoubtedly a great way to experience the island's magnificent nature without tiring yourself out. Instead of hiking across a volcano, unwind in a hot spring heated by a volcano!


Bathing in Iceland’s healing waters is a unique and rejuvenating experience, and there are plenty of places from which to choose. You can head out into nature and find a natural spring, or opt for a more luxurious experience in an Icelandic spa.

Read on to discover the best spas in Iceland, and find a spot in which to dip your toes while on your road trip.


Iceland spa guide

Blue Lagoon


Blue Lagoon is considered by many people as one of the best spas in Iceland. This is probably one of Iceland's most visited destinations as well, and with good reason!


The spa is surrounded by incredible lava landscapes, and fields of jagged black rock covered in creeping grey moss. A barren volcano can be seen towering in the distance.

Relaxation is top priority at Blue Lagoon. As steam rises from the milky, turquoise blue water, you can feel yourself breathing in tranquility.

The mineral-infused waters in the Blue Lagoon Iceland mud baths possess healing properties. They've been used to treat everything from acne to eczema and other health ailments, so grab a handful and give yourself a mud mask. The spa also has a whole menu of spa treatments to choose from, including massages and skincare.

Blue Lagoon is located at the foot of Mount Þorbjörn on the Reykjanes Peninsula, and is only an hour drive from Reykjavík.

It is open all year round, but closing times change depending on the season. Check the website for details.

Prices start from €306 / £265 / $304 for two people.


Best Spas in Iceland: Blue Lagoon

Myvatn Nature Baths


Myvatn Nature Baths Iceland is a small, relaxing and intimate spa in the north of Iceland. It is located in the Myvatn Nature Reserve, close to the north shore of Lake Myvatn.

People often wonder how hot are the spas in Iceland. Each spa will vary, but usually an outside spa in Iceland will have a temperature around 38 degrees Celsius like the ones at Myvatn. The water at this spa is rich in minerals such as calcium, magnesium and sodium. The water fills up from an underground spring that has been heated by magma from a volcano.

The Myvatn Nature Baths offer facilities such as Iceland saunas and Iceland steam baths with hot mineral water. They also offer massages, facials, manicures and pedicures for those who want to relax or beautify themselves after their bath.

The opening hours are from 11am to 9pm during summer months (June-August)

Prices start from €42 / £37 / $43 for one person.


Iceland lake spa

Laugarvatn Fontana Spa


The Laugarvatn Fontana Spa is a Scandinavian hot spring located in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavík. It is said to be one of the best thermal pools in Reykjavík and one of the most popular spas in Reykjavík Iceland. The spa is situated close to the famous geothermal area of Laugardalur.

The Laugarvatn Fontana Spa offers a variety of treatments, including massages and scrubs. The spa also has various pools, Iceland saunas and Iceland steam baths.

Besides swimming and relaxing treatments, the spa has a restaurant. It caters clients with traditional Icelandic lunch and dinner, using fresh, local ingredients. There is also a bakery which cooks its bread and pastries using the volcanic heat of the area.

The opening hours are from 8am to 10pm throughout the year, with an extra hour on Fridays until 11pm.

Prices start from €32 / £28 / $32 for one person.


Iceland geothermal pool

Krauma Iceland Spa Resort


Krauma is an Iceland spa resort steeped in luxury. It isn't just a day spa, it's an Iceland hotel with a hot spring, making this a great option for an Iceland spa vacation. The spa is often cited as being one of the best spa hotels in Iceland.

The spa pumps water straight from Deildartunguhver hot spring before using ice from the Ok glacier to cool it to the exact temperature needed. The steam in the steam rooms also comes directly from the hot spring and is delightfully scented with oils.

Krauma has a total of six baths; five warm and one cold. No chemicals are needed to keep the pools and baths clean. This is due to the water being constantly replaced because of the natural flow rate of the Scandinavian hot springs.

The resort is in the North West of Iceland, near the town of Mosfellsbaer in Snaefellsnes Peninsula. It’s only a 60-minute drive from Reykjavík, making it a good choice for those using the city as their home base.

Prices start from €35 / £30 / $35 for adults, but they have reduced rates for teenagers and children.


Best Spas in Iceland: Krama
Credit to Krama Facebook Page

The Secret Lagoon


The Secret Lagoon is a geothermal spa in the town of Flúðir, Iceland. It is one of the oldest geothermal spas in Iceland, having been built in 1891.

The Secret Lagoon is located in an area known as Djúpavogskógar, which translates to "deep valley of boiling water." The lagoon itself is made up of two pools; one that is 33°C and one that is 38°C. The water flows from the ground, over rocks and into the pools.

Less tourists visit The Secret Lagoon, making it a more affordable choice than some other Iceland spa vacations. However, be aware that this is a no-frills experience. They don't have treatments or even the extras like saunas or steam rooms.

This outside spa in Iceland is a great option for relaxation seekers travelling the Golden Circle. After you've visited Thingvellir, Gullfoss, and Geysir; you can stop at this Iceland spa before returning to Reykjavík.

Prices start from €21 / £19 / $22 per person.


Iceland spa resorts

The Beer Spa


Beer in Iceland was banned until 1989. Since the ban was lifted, Icelanders haven't pulled back from showing their love for their favorite drink, and places like this are the demonstration.


The Beer Spa isn’t technically a geothermal Iceland spa, but it’s an experience that simply cannot be overlooked. The Bjorbodin Beer Spa in North Iceland is probably one of the most unique places you'll ever visit.

At this out of the ordinary Icelandic spa, you'll find hot tubs filled with beer. At first, this may seem a bit strange, but the live beer yeast does wonders for your skin.

The Bjorbodin Beer Spa knows that you're going to get thirsty for your favorite brew, so they’ve installed Kaldi Icelandic beer on tap next to each tub!

Prices start from €71 / £61 / $71 per person.


Iceland sauna with beer

Vök Baths


Vök Baths is a luxury Iceland lake spa located east of the island. Its remote location among the country's famous East Fjords, make it an exclusive retreat.


East Iceland is not normally associated with geothermal heat, making the warm waters of Vök even more unique. For centuries, people living around Lake Urriðavatn noticed certain spots on the lake that curiously did not freeze. The Icelandic name given to these ice-free patches is “vök”, hence the spas name.

Tourists who decide to visit the Iceland spa called Vök Baths will be close to Egilsstaðir, which is the largest town in the region. Those making their way around Iceland's Ring Road frequently use this town as a stop-off point going between Vatnajökull and Húsavik or Akureyri.

Prices start from €71 / £62 / $72 for an adult. There are concessions for the young and the elderly.


Scandinavian hot springs

Djúpavogskörin Hot Spring


Located in the East of Iceland, the Djúpavogskörin hot spring is a hidden gem. It’s located off a main road, just before the historic town of Djúpivogur, and hidden behind a large rock. If you didn’t know it was there, you’d likely never spot it.

Unlike the other Iceland spas in this list, the Djúpavogskörin hot spring isn’t a spa. This pool was set up by the locals purely to enjoy the geothermal water that occurred naturally there. There are no staff members on hand at this site to offer you massages. The Djúpavogskörin hot spring is all about enjoying Scandinavian hot springs in the most authentic way.

The fjords surrounding the pool, with their vivid green mosses and algae, looks spectacular. Furthermore, they provide you a breathtaking view while you relax. Whether you visit on a clear sunny day or a wintry and snowy one, you will cherish the time spent at this secret spot.

There are no changing facilities at Djúpavogskörin hot spring, but there is a small panel behind which you go. Either that or you’ll need to change in your car.

Djúpavogskörin hot spring is technically open all year round as it’s a public place, and there is no fee to use it.


Djúpivogur spa, Iceland

GeoSea Geothermal Sea Baths


Unlike other Iceland spas, the pools at GeoSea are seawater and are geothermally heated. The saltwater baths are rich in minerals that revitalize the skin, stimulate circulation, and relax muscles.

The GeoSea baths are located in the town of Húsavík which sits on the Diamond Circle route. It is a great pitstop for those travelling this famous sightseeing route or those visiting Lake Mývatn, Dettifoss Waterfall and Akureyri.

GeoSea is built into a cliffside which overlooks Skjálfandi, a bay in North Iceland. This bay is well known for its abundant marine life. As you bathe in one of the five outdoor infinity pools, you might spot minke whale, humpback, or white-beaked dolphins.

Prices start from €39 / £34 / $39 per person.


Geosea Geothermal baths, Iceland

Choosing a Spa in Iceland


Iceland is a country with many natural wonders, and the geothermal pools are one of the most popular attractions. With over 40 different pools to choose from, and many more natural pools found in nature, you’re sure to find one that suits your needs.

Some of the spas are harder to reach by public transport, so you may wish to book a car for your visit to Iceland.


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